Famous Scottish Landmarks | Amazing Buildings and Spots in Scotland

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Famous Scottish Landmarks

There is a little bit of everything for everyone in Scotland. From rolling highlands, busy cities, and mythical sea monsters to famous landmarks. If you go a bit further into the country, you’ll be amazed by the breathtaking scenery and history. It’s difficult not to feel like you’re in a period movie when you walk in the footsteps of kings and queens. You can visit centuries-old castles or tour around the many different historical monuments and landmarks.

Top Famous Scottish Landmarks

Scone Palace

Scone Palace

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The ancestral residence of the Earls of Mansfield, Scone Palace, was often frequented by many famous historical figures, including fictional ones. Some of these include Macbeth and Charles II. Scone radiates historical energy and is the old Scottish monarchs’ crowning stone. See the Stone of Scone, often known as the Stone of Destiny, which is currently kept in Edinburgh Castle. You can walk along Long Galley, where King Charles II was crowned in 1661. You can also admire Mary Queen of Scots’ needlework talents on her bed hangings. Scone Palace is surrounded by lovely gardens and woods, making it ideal for a walk or picnic, all while the local inquisitive peacocks keep a lookout.

Luskentyre Beach

Luskentyre has been called one of the world’s greatest beaches, surpassing the Virgin Islands. It’s even rated higher than some of the best beaches in Italy and Spain. In the middle of a three-mile-wide estuary, Luskentyre Beach has been cut into the island. Huge sand dunes surround it on all sides, blocking unwanted views of the nearby road. It’s easy to pass the day strolling down the seafront in Luskentyre without seeing a single other person. The beach is a photographer’s dream too. It’s particularly worth visiting in late spring and summer, as the ebbing tide reveals an expanse of channels and sandbars.

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Famous Scottish Landmarks – Floors Castle

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Floors Castle is a famous Scottish country mansion. This family residence was occupied by 11 generations of the Dukes of Roxburghe. The views from the castle’s great halls of the River Tweed and the Cheviot Hills to the south are spectacular. Or, if you prefer being outdoors, you can wander through ambient woodlands or along a riverbank path. There are also beautiful Victorian walled gardens. For the kids, the indoor adventure playground has something for all of them. The grounds also have a castle gift collection, apple shed shop and deli, so you can enjoy the popular preserves and pickles. If you want, you can stick around longer to enjoy tray bakes and lunches in either of the two cafés.

Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh is a world-class botanical garden. The garden is just a mile from the city centre and provides excellent views of the capital’s skyline, including Edinburgh Castle. Visitors have the opportunity to learn about its 350-year history as well as its plants. The scenery in the gardens is wonderful, and the Chinese hillside offers peace and tranquillity. The Rock Garden and Woodland Garden, on the other hand, provide beautiful Giant Redwood trees. Inverleith House, the garden’s exhibition area, also has magnificent artwork.
Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

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Cawdor Castle

Cawdor Castle

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Cawdor Castle was first constructed around a 15th-century tower house. This tower house belonged to Clan Cawdor before passing to the Campbells in the century following. Legend says that the castle was constructed around a thorn tree, which has been shown to be a 1372 holly found in the dungeon. Check out the majestic drawing room with its wall of portraits showing whole generations of Campbells. You can also take in the tapestried bedroom with its priceless wall hangings. The dining room with its magnificent stone fireplace is also on full display.

Castle Stalker

Castle Stalker is located in Loch Laich, a tidal islet off Loch Linnhe, near Port Appin, Argyll. To put it simply: it’s breathtaking. If the tide is out, you’ll be able to walk to the fort house, but beware of any approaching waves. The castle is said to have grown from a modest residential fort around 1320; Stewarts later received this title and the lands in around 1388. Sir John Stewart, Lord of Lorn in the 1440s, is the person who shaped the castle’s current character. In the violent and terrible clan battles that followed, one Scottish family became entangled in the castle’s history. During one particular event in 1520, a nurse hid a newborn, Donald Stewart, in the castle to spare his life.

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Famous Scottish Landmarks – Craigievar Castle

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Discover the stunning home that inspired Disney’s Cinderella Castle. You can take a quiet walk around the garden and estate or see the amazing collection of antiques and art. The castle is a fine example of Scottish Baronial architecture, and it blends seamlessly with the hills of Aberdeenshire. The castle’s pink exquisite tower will captivate both youngsters and adults. Furthermore, the grounds include a Scottish glen garden and two forest paths. For gorgeous scenery, remember that the bluebells bloom early in the summer. Look for red squirrels or pine martens in the bushes too.

Fyvie Castle

Fyvie Castle, an 800-year-old castle in Aberdeenshire, is teeming with mythology and folklore, and it has many stunning antiques, suits of armour, and oil paintings. Drop by and visit the restored glass-roofed racquets court and ice house. Check out Fyvie and immerse yourself in its beauty and rich history. The vast portrait collection includes one of the world’s biggest private Raeburn collections, and the exquisite furnishings, tapestries, weapons, and armour are equally remarkable. The former 18th-century walled garden is now a Scottish fruit and vegetable garden. Fyvie Loch is a stunning natural feature that attracts many wildfowl. Winter visitors include greylag geese, tufted ducks, and goldeneyes, while ospreys come to fish in the loch.

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Famous Scottish Landmarks – Scott Monument

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Sir Walter Scott was a well-known Scottish writer who died in 1832. When he died, Edinburgh held a competition to choose the best design for a monument in his honour. George M Kemp was the winner, and construction on the Scott Monument started in 1840. It’s very easy to find, it’s between Princes Street Gardens and Princes Street. Visitors that climb to the top are rewarded with probably the finest view of the city. However, please note that only 24 people per hour can climb the 174-year-old monument — and they must be taken on a guided tour. Also, bear in mind that there are no lifts, only steps, which can be very gloomy at times.

Edinburgh Old Town

Historic Edinburgh’s Old Town is a maze of cobblestone streets and tiny alleys, and the Old Town is full of famous places to visit, from Edinburgh Castle on Castle Rock to the magnificent Palace of Holyroodhouse. On Chambers Street, the National Museum of Scotland has a wide variety of rare antiquities. You can also take a tour of Edinburgh’s catacombs and find a hidden world of forgotten rooms. Interesting fact: these catacombs were once the home to the city’s impoverished.

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Bell Rock Lighthouse

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On the well-known Inchcape reef, 11 miles off the coast of Arbroath, lies the Bell Rock Lighthouse. At high tide, the reef is approximately 12 feet below the surface of the sea, and at low tide is 4 feet above the sea. This lighthouse is the oldest surviving sea-washed lighthouse on the planet. Robert Stevenson constructed it between 1807 and 1810, and its light can be seen from 56 statute kilometres inland, thanks to its 35-meter height. The stone construction that supports the lighthouse is also extremely well-constructed, and it didn’t need to be rebuilt or modified in almost 200 years.

Famous Scottish Landmarks – The Royal Yacht Britannia

The Royal Yacht Britannia was launched in 1953 from a Clydebank shipyard. It went on to serve as Her Majesty The Queen’s royal home for almost forty years. It was a part of many significant royal occasions throughout its years of service, including formal state visits, banquets, receptions, and royal holidays. Sir Winston Churchill, Nelson Mandela, and Frank Sinatra. The yacht is currently berthed in the historic Port of Leith, and it serves as an exclusive nighttime events venue. It is one of Scotland’s top tourist attractions.
Famous Scottish Landmarks – The Royal Yacht Britannia

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Chauffeured tours to the places above

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